Saving the planet... one garment at a time!

... and one upcycle at a time... Welcome to my blog: A place to have an "over the fence conversation" about sewing, altered couture, upcycling, and all kinds of crafts using found objects, beads, ephemera and other vintage finds!


Tuesday, April 3, 2012

Would You Consider Making Your Own Wedding Dress?

I'm sincerely interested in your answers to that question.  You see I'm getting married in August and I assumed I'd be making my own gown.  I've made them for others, so why not for myself?


I want to do it for economic reasons, for environmental reasons, for romantic reasons, and for sentimental reasons. DIY certainly seems to be the choice of most brides today when it comes to the favors, decor, flowers, etc.  At least it seems that way when you look at Pinterest pinboards, or the myriad of wedding sites in the blogosphere.

Then I started reading some other sewing blogs on the subject.  In her recent post, What I Learned While Sewing My Wedding Dress, Kim from Cotton Creek Sewing has some really great advice, including buying extra fabric and being willing to start over.  I plan on using satin from my mother's wedding gown, so extra fabric may not be an option, though I am looking for some look-alike satin just in case. 

I already incorporated my Mother's wedding gown in my daughter's Odette tutu.  To  make the basque, I separated the bodice from the skirts, removed the sleeves, and replaced the zipper with a grommeted lace-up closure.  The tutu was made from scratch, but the top layers were netting and re-embroidered lace from the skirt of my Mother's gown.


I saved all the other bits and pieces, but not with the idea of ever using them for a dress for myself. I never thought I'd get married the first time, let alone remarry!  I like the idea of wearing at least parts of my mother's gown, I like the ecology of refashioning, I like that most of the fabric will be free, and I like that the result will be uniquely me.  I have some vague visions of what the completed dress will look like.

Meg, from A Practical Wedding, started out with a family  (group effort) sewn wedding gown, only to find that the dress, despite a muslin and multiple mailed back and forth fittings,  did not fit properly.  The hand sewn gown was jettisoned in favor of a vintage find.  Though I plan to do all the sewing myself, could I end up needing a "Plan B gown"?

Many sewists do their own gowns.  Examples includes Melissa of FehrTradeThe Curious Kiwi,  and the totally impressive Iowahoodlum of FeatherPetalSilk, who learned to sew by doing her wedding gown! 

Well, would you do it?  Let me know!

16 comments:

  1. I've thought about this before and I'm totally torn on this topic. I think I lean ever so slightly toward trying to find a vintage dress to wear rather than trying to sew my own dress, but really...it's hard to decide what to do!(good thing I'm not engaged)

    I do really like the idea of using parts of your mom's gown. I'm sentimental like that. :)

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  2. I've seen gowns sold on the net that are quite simple and economical in price, like around $100. You might want to buy a very simple gown and do your own embellishments with your mother's gown. That way it will fit better and you won't stress to see if you need more fabric. You might purchase one size larger and taylor it to your body and it would trully look like it was made for you. Just an idea.

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  3. It was great to go through your post. Wedding are very special moments so its very necessary to get everything perfect.

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  4. I LOVE HelloCurls idea. Buy a simple dress and add embellishments. Remember that planning a wedding can be stressful so any thigk you can do to simplify is better. When I got married my Mom and I made my dress. We also made all the invitations, center pieces, party favors, and flower arrangements. It didn't seem like much when we talked about it, but it ended up being a lot and it got pretty stressful (even though each thing was simple).

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  5. Thanks for stopping by and following! I am following you. I am actually planning on making my wedding dress so I can make it exactly how I want it to look while still keeping it as inexpensive as I can. I think that using bits from your mother's gown is a great idea.
    Casey
    sewingandmusic.blogspot.com

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  6. Interestingly, I actually DID make my own wedding dress. I knew what I wanted exactly, and didn't see it anywhere in early looks through bridal shops. Being married in early March, choosing a date to honor what would have been my parent's 50th anniversary I wanted a winter style, an ivory velvet skirt and brocade bodice, which is exactly what I ultimately had. Sewing it myself was an adventure; though a long time sewer, it had been a while, to say the least. And of course, I was still finishing it the night before the wedding. But all's well that ends well; 16 plus years later, we are very happy, and I still treasure my own one of a kind dress. And congratulations to you... I'm so happy to hear your good news ! :)

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  7. I did make my own wedding dress, and never regretted it. I was partly motivated by cost, and partly by wanting something I couldn't find in the shops! My dress was plain white cotton, no lace or trimmings except for a series of pearl style buttons (with loop closures) on the sleeves. I borrowed a lovely crinoline and net petticoats from two different friends.I made my veil too (spotted net attached to a headband which I had covered with white ribbon; a friend added flowers to it just before the wedding. I made my bridesmaid's dress too (I used the same style as my wedding dress but cut it down to 3/4 length and made it of blue cotton). I also made my going away outfit (a suit) - and it was this which proved to be the hardest part of the sewing. I would say that I bought a dressmaker's dummy and found it absolutely invaluable for fitting.

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  9. Beautiful wedding dress. It's really unique. Thanks for sharing this to us.

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  10. I definitely plan to make my own gown! This will be my second marriage, but my first marriage ceremony. As I will be, somewhat reluctantly, changing my last name (again), I want to embrace my maiden name and my heritage by making a GREEN wedding dress. (My maiden name being Green and my heritage being Scotch/Irish.)I've also started researching, in further depth, my family's exact lineage to incorporate a KILT for him. He has agreed with the notion and so the search for that will begin soon. I want to make a truly unique, steampunkish, extravagant dress for my (second) special day. Here's the catcher..... I'll be sewing as a somewhat beginner! (I'm a little rusty.) Best wishes and happy marriages!

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  11. ive just made me own wedding dress. i found a dress i loved but it was $2500! and i dont have that kind of cash. i havent sown anything since i was about 10years old.. and i made my dress. it took me ages but i did it. You tube is great for help.

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  12. I borrowed a lovely crinoline and net petticoats from two different friends.I made my veil too (spotted net attached to a headband which I had covered with white ribbon; a friend added flowers to it just before the wedding.
    wedding speeches examples

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  13. I might! With the sewing lessons my dad taught me (yes, my dad sews while I don't.epic, right?), maybe I can save more aside from buying bridal gowns long island. Not to mention it's my own design as well.

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  14. I don’t think many of websites provide this type of information.
    have you seen

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  15. Adding this to my ever growing list of tutorials of yours to make. Thanks for the inspiration!
    ‹ Previous
    The Best Informal White Wedding Dresses Short and Long

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